Use of the Earigator in Cleaning

Use of the Earigator in Cleaning
Waxy Dog's Ear Canal

Waxy Dog’s Ear Canal

This is an example of an ear that benefited from a thorough cleaning using the OtoPet-USA Earigator. View a picture of the thick ceruminous discharge within this dog’s ear canal that was taken using the OtoPet-USA Video Otoscope here.

The OtoPet-USA Earigator may be used for lavage and suction of the ear canal to remove exudate and cerumen. Cleaning of the ear canal is an important component in the management of ear disease. Cleaning allows the removal of exudate and cerumen, allowing the visualization of the ear canal and the tympanic membrane, as well as contact of medication if needed.

In this case, the patient was placed under general anesthetia, which is required for a through otic flushing. An endotracheal tube was placed and the patient was positioned in lateral recumbancy.

The ear canal was visualized using the Video Otoscope. If needed, samples for cytology, culture and sensitivity should be collected and imaging studies should be performed prior to flushing the ear canal.

The type of discharge in the ear directs the selection of an appropriate initial flush. If the discharge is waxy, a cleaner with good ceruminolytic properties should be used. If the discharge is mucoid and purulent, an aqueous cleaner is preferable.

Copious flushing of the ear canal with a warmed aqueous flush should be performed after the initial flush to remove any residual ear cleanser and minimize any irritation from the cleanser. Flushingn also helps to remove the debris.

A ceruminolytic cleanser was initially instilled into this ear to break up the thick cerumen. This was followed by a warm aqueous flush using the OtoPet-USA Earigator. Directions on how to use the Earigator are below.

Finally, the ear was evaluated again with the Video Otoscope to ensure it was clean. Alligator forceps inserted through the OtoPet-USA Video Otoscope probe may be used to remove any excess debris if needed as well. Most of the debris was removed with the Earigator in this case but residual pieces required removal with forceps.

If you have an interesting case that you would like to submit with pictures, please contact Dr. Jessica Melman Bhatia at jessvet3@aol.com.